Svastha Yoga / Ayurveda

Svastha Yoga/Ayurveda is an authentic and integrated approach to Yoga. It combines the ancient, traditional, health care system Ayurveda, with the eight limbs of Yoga as described by Patanjali in the Yoga Sutras. A.G. Mohan developed Svastha Yoga as a means of total health care. It addresses both the body and the mind to restore health and well-being.

For more about Svastha Yoga/Ayurveda. visit www.svastha.com

Dr. Nancy is passionate about Yoga. She is a certified Svastha Yoga Therapy Instructor, having studied Svastha Yoga/Ayurveda, and Yoga Therapy with Sri A.G. Mohan and Ganesh Mohan, a long-time student of Sri Krishnamacharya.

She teaches private classes and designs personalized yoga therapy programs in her practice at Elder Chiropractic Clinic. She also teaches anatomy and physiology in yoga teacher training courses.

For a private, personalized, Yoga therapy program, contact her via email at dr.nancy.schrauth@gmail.com or call (65) 6734 858

More about Yoga

Svastha, a Sanskrit word, combines the roots Sva (the self) and stha (to stay), and translates literally "to stay as the Self", an Ayurvedic term, it is interpreted to mean "a state of re-integration, health, well-being".

According to the Yoga Sutra's of Patanjali, the ultimate goal of yoga is to settle the mind so that we have clarity about the true nature of our self which will bring about a lasting state of peace. Practicing the eight limbs of yoga as Patanjali describes is the method to achieve mental clarity.

One of the core principals of a Svastha Yoga asana practice is the emphasis on the spine and the breath. The spine is the structural support for the body and protects the spinal cord. Poor posture and other types of spinal misalignments can affect the health and function of the entire body. For example, hunching over a desk for long hours at the computer causes stress and strain in the upper back, this can become a chronic problem after a few years and eventually leads to common problems like carpal tunnel syndrome, neck pain, and numbness radiating into arms and hands. The lungs and heart must strain against the resistance of tension in the chest and upper torso which can contribute to health problems.

In Svastha Yoga, we apply a breathing method that reduces strain and tension and actively works the spine to restore proper alignment. The emphasis on linking the movements with the appropriate phase of the breath allows the breath to gently focus the work on the spine. This way of working has the potential to correct long-standing areas of misalignment, poor posture, stiffness and weakness.

All movements are done in coordination with the breathing, mentally coordinating the speed and direction of movements with the length of the breath. In this way while we are strengthening our body, we also strengthen our ability to focus our mind. The mind is completely focused on the breath during the asana practice; when the mind is focused on coordinating the movements of the body with the breath, there is a unity of body, breath and mind. This integration accomplishes the ultimate purpose of yoga.

In this approach the principals of Svastha Yoga are applied to the individual. That is, we take into consideration that everyone is different and must work in their own way with their own specific condition.  Our class size is kept small to ensure that each student is given individual attention and the teacher can make the necessary modifications for each person.

In my chiropractic practice, I have found Svastha Yoga to be very helpful for recovery from any type of back pain, neck pain, weakness or numbness in the limbs or the spine. I have been teaching my patients Svastha Yoga Therapy as a means to recover from many types of musculoskeletal pain, functional problems such as poor digestion, sleeping disorders, and mental/emotional stress.

Of course it is well accepted that prevention is always better than treating problems, and Svastha Yoga is an integrated approach that not only helps correct problems but also offers the means to prevent problems and maintain a state of good health and well-being.